Aim To Save: How To Choose The Best Paintball Gun

best paintball gun

Can I start by saying how much fun it was testing those 37 paintball guns? Personally, I feel that the most important qualities of any given paintball gun is accuracy, fire rate, and of course affordability.

All of which played a huge role in my testing phase for this article.

Some guns fired straight but seemed to weigh a ton. Others were light and rugged but I could not hit a mark, even if it was standing right in front of me. I realized that finding the right paintball gun is harder than it seems.

Whether your a veteran at spraying paint or a newbie on the field; the right gun makes all the difference.

I managed to find 5 hardcore paintball markers that just felt right in my hands.

The best part?

They’re actually not as expensive as I would have thought. Most of them come in under $200 (except for those from Planet Eclipse)

I also included a short buyers guide to help you find a gun that suits you. Here are the 5 best paintball guns I found:

  NameTriggerFire RateRating 
Best Overall
Tippmann CronusMechanical7-12 BPS4.9/5Check Price
Best Budget
Tippmann TMC MAGFEDPneumatic20+ BPS4.7/5Check Price
Best Quality
Planet Eclipse ETEK5Electric20+BPS4.7/5Check Price
Woodsball
Tippmann A-5By choiceMax. 17 BPS4.6/5Check Price
Speedball
Planet Eclipse Etha 2By choice15-20+ BPS4.5/5Check Price
I

t’s war out there, and you’re going to need a marker that you can trust. Whether its speedball, woodsball, or anything in between—the following information will help you to find the perfect marker for your game.

With models ranging from fully pneumatic to sniper barrel packages, this comprehensive list will outline everything you need to know about the best paintball guns on today’s market.

Best Paintball Guns

Paintball Gun Comparison Chart

tippman cronus
Best Overall!

Tippmann Cronus

  • 4.9/5 Rating
  • Mechanical
  • 7-12 BPS
  • 8.0lb
tippman cronus

Recommendation

Tippmann has refined its most popular model to give us the Cronus paintball gun: winner of our ‘Best Overall Option’ title.

One of the most reliable and durable markers you can find, the Tippmann Cronus will survive any woodsball course you can find.

Our Rating: 4.9/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
Mechanical
Fire Rate
7-12 BPS
Weight
8.0lb
Best Suited For
Woodsball/ Outdoor
Special Features
Internal gas line

Tippmann Cronus

Who Should Buy

Perfect for beginner and intermediate players, looking for a comfortable marker with good accuracy. The best paintball gun for your money.Click here for the Tippmann Cronus

Review

The Tippmann Cronus is a fine model for players who are just learning (or learning to love) Woodsball. Based on what is still one of the most commonly used markers in the world—the Tippmann 98—this newer Cronus model has kept of all the classic elements. One of the most reliable and durable paintball guns on the market, the Cronus will take whatever you throw or shoot at it, and then some.

There is very little recoil on this gun, and the two-piece handle design with vertical grip makes for a comfortable hold. For less advanced players, it can be a perfect marker for learning to shoot. Since it uses a mechanical trigger system, the Cronus won’t be pumping out 15BPS rapid bursts. However, this model makes up for speed with decent range and very good accuracy.

Pros
  • Easily customized
  • Accurate shooter
  • Vertical Grip
  • Comfortable handling
  • Very Durable
  • Value for money
Cons
  • Heavy marker
  • Slow fire rate
tippman tmc magfed
Best Budget!

Tippmann TMC MAGFED

  • 4.7/5 Rating
  • Pneumatic
  • 20+ BPS
  • 3.5lb
tippman tmc magfed

Recommendation

The Tippmann TMC allows you the freedom of feeding with both magazine and hopper systems, so that no matter what situation you find yourself in on the field, you can be prepared. A fast firing, fully pneumatic marker.

Our Rating: 4.7/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
Pneumatic
Fire Rate
20+ BPS
Weight
3.5lb
Best Suited For
Woodsball
Special Features
Dual-feed option

Tippmann TMC MAGFED

Who Should Buy

Woodsball players who are likely to play both up-close and distance games. The TMC is a marker with a variety of strengths, for players who like to mix it up.Click here for the Tippmann TMC MAGFED

Review

Tippmann have placed themselves another quality product on my list: the TMC magfed. And while the name suggests that this marker is magazine-fed, what I like about it is its dual-option feeding system. So you can go hopper or magazine, depending on your preference. And with it being a fully pneumatic marker, you will want to make sure that you can fill it up whichever feeding system you choose. You’re going to be shooting fast. Really fast.

With Tippmann’s proven in-line bolt system and an authentic AR15 look to it, the TMC magfed is an incredibly hot option. Considering its size, the original model is incredibly lightweight. This means that you can easily beef it up with whatever upgrades you like, without worrying about it getting too heavy. That’s another great thing about the Tippmann TMC—while it comes fully functional, it’s also very easily customized.

Pros
  • Fast, fast, fast
  • Lightweight
  • Sturdy frame
  • Authentic AR15 design
  • Dual-feeding
  • Variety of strengths
Cons
  • Not the most accurate marker
  • Can break down
planet eclipse etek5
Best Quality!

Planet Eclipse ETEK5

  • 4.7/5 Rating
  • Electric
  • 20+BPS
  • 2.2lb
planet eclipse etek5

Recommendation

Not only has Planet Eclipse stuck with the stunning LV1 aesthetic, but the ETEK5 can pretty much compete with its $1000+ look-alike in all matters performance. Durability, endurance, accuracy and feel; all of these factors are incredibly well-adapted in the ETEK5 from Planet Eclipse, and make for a marker of the highest quality.

Our Rating: 4.7/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
Electric
Fire Rate
20+BPS
Weight
2.2lb
Best Suited For
Speedball
Special Features
LPR 85psi

Planet Eclipse ETEK5

Who Should Buy

This is a marker for serious players who don’t want to (or cannot afford to) spend $1000+ on a super-class marker.Click here for the Planet Eclipse ETEK5

Review

The Planet Eclipse ETEK5 is perhaps one of the best markers in the world in its price range. Not only is it one of the sleekest, most attractive models you will find—it runs like a Cadillac, too. One of the first things that the familiar paint-baller will notice is, in fact, the aesthetic. It looks like an LV1. Now, for those of you who aren’t so familiar with the wider world of markers, the LV1 is one of the best and most popular models of marker. It’s also one of the most expensive.

This is why having an ETEK5 is somewhat like having a knock-off ROLEX. Except, when I say knock-off, imagine that the knock-off is actually a perfect match. That’s what makes this marker so incredible. With its Zick 3 bolt line and a 85-150psi operating pressure, this marker means serious business. It shoots as good as any marker I’ve ever seen, and you can comfortably run through 1000 balls without needing to clean your barrel out.

Truly, this is perhaps the best paintball gun you will find for anything less than a grand.

Pros
  • Low pressure capacity
  • Quiet shot
  • Rapid Fire!
  • Very accurate
  • Sleek, attractive design
  • Zick 3 bolt line
Cons
  • Complicated maintenance for beginners
tippmann a5
Woodsball!

Tippmann A-5

  • 4.6/5 Rating
  • By choice
  • Max. 17 BPS
  • 5.5lb
tippmann a5

Recommendation

Suitable for woodsman or scenario play, the Tippman A-5 is an affordable marker that’s highly customizable, light-weight, and ergonomic for comfortable use. This is a solid paintball gun that, in my experience, almost never jams, shoots accurately over long distances, and handles very well.

Our Rating: 4.6/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
By choice
Fire Rate
Max. 17 BPS
Weight
5.5lb
Best Suited For
Woodsball
Special Features
Cyclone Feed System

Tippmann A-5

Who Should Buy

Woodsman or Scenario players who enjoy upgrading and customizing their marker will get a lot of mileage out of this gun. If you’re looking for a sturdy and reliable paintball gun you might want to check this one out.Click here for the Tippmann A-5

Review

The Tippmann A5 marker is a quality product which boasts reliability and speed. A 16″ barrel length for greater accuracy, this marker is perfect for the one-shot kill player. That being said, the A5 from Tippmann utilizes its Cyclone Feed System to full effect, making for a quick availability that will let you fire as quickly as you like.

The A5 has a shock-absorbing end cap for less recoil, all-aluminum die-cast receiver and a 200-round stock hopper. While it does weigh a bit more than other markers on the list, I’m still a big fan of this product. Designed for the sharp-shooter, it certainly meets the mark, and at a very reasonable price the A5 Sniper from Tippmann is a top choice for Woodsball long-distance players.

Pros
  • Very accurate shot
  • Great range
  • Realistic, black design
  • Sniper Barrel included
  • Easily customized
  • Cyclone feed system
Cons
  • Heavy marker
  • Added equipment necessary
  • Requires some maintenance
planet eclipse etha 2
Speedball!

Planet Eclipse Etha 2

  • 4.5/5 Rating
  • By choice
  • 15-20+ BPS
  • 2.05lb
planet eclipse etha 2

Recommendation

Planet Eclipse have provided yet another fine example of a lightweight marker, with incredible durability. The Etha 2 has taken all of the good things about its original and made into something that will truly last. One of the most reliable markers you can find.

Our Rating: 4.5/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
By choice
Fire Rate
15-20+ BPS
Weight
2.05lb
Best Suited For
Speedball
Special Features
GRN composite outer body

Planet Eclipse Etha 2

Who Should Buy

If you’ve never tried your luck on the speedball arena, this is the perfect marker for you. Reliable, top-notch fire rate and a lightweight gun that won’t weigh you down.Click here for the Planet Eclipse Etha 2

Review

The Etha line offers yet another impressive list of markers from Planet Eclipse. And the Etha 2 might just be its shining star. We knew that the original Etha was made for people on a budget, and you could tell that it was made on a budget. Not this upgrade. They’ve spent a little more, and packed it with an incredible list of features.

Let’s start with the shell. This is one of the most durable, reliable markers you will find. Operating on the more-than-proven Gamma Core technology, the Etha 2 will survive and thrive in whatever environment you throw at it. With its rock-solid composite external frame in combination with an aircraft-grade aluminum interior, the Etha 2 is built to last.

Many users compliment the Etha on its light feel. This characteristic makes for an incredibly natural and easy shot. So that with the Etha’s finely-tuned, accurate barrel, this is one all-around handy marker.

Pros
  • Light feel
  • Gamma Core
  • Aluminum interior
  • GRN composite frame
  • Hose-less air transfer
  • Durable
Cons
  • More expensive than original
  • Some kickback
empire paintball mini gs
Empire Paintball Mini GS
  • 4.2/5 Rating
  • E-trigger
  • 15+ BPS
  • 3.5lb
empire paintball mini gs

Recommendation

The Empire Mini GS is a brilliant upgrade of the original (and already popular) Empire Mini. With added features like its full wrap-around foregrip, the GS mini has a great shooting feel. Still a fast-firing, accurate marker, the GS model is one of Empire’s finest models.

Our Rating: 4.2/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
E-trigger
Fire Rate
15+ BPS
Weight
3.5lb
Best Suited For
Speedball
Special Features
Wrap-around foregrip

Empire Paintball Mini GS

Who Should Buy

Speedball and indoor players looking for a compact, lightweight marker. Accurate, fast-firing and easy to handle.Click here for the Empire Paintball Mini GS

Review

The Empire Mini GS is another impressive piece of equipment from the Empire Mini line. With the success of the original, the Empire crew have taken a good thing and made it better. Living up to its name, the Empire GS is indeed much smaller than other markers out there. This makes for the lightweight, easy-to-control gameplay which Mini-owners have come to love.

Now to the upgrades. The GS offers a full wrap-around foregrip, for better grip and control of the handle. And thanks to its improved design, this foregrip no longer needs to be removed. The GS has a simple drop-in, Redline OLED board, so you don’t need to change the foregrip.

Along with these added bonuses, all of the best things about the Empire Mini still remain. The pressure controlled poppet engine is as powerful as ever and the accuracy for such fast firing is still of the highest standard. With a pressure gauge included on the air-connector, you can also check your remaining air without losing any precious seconds. The Mini GS is a top choice for speedball players.

Pros
  • Good fire rate
  • Accurate for indoor play
  • Full wrap-around foregrip
  • Lightweight
  • Redline OLED board
  • E-trigger
Cons
  • Not suited to long-range
  • Slight recoil
  • Prone to needing maintenance
d3fy sports d3s
D3FY Sports D3S
  • 4.0/5 Rating
  • E-trigger
  • 15+ BPS
  • 2.1lbs
d3fy sports d3s

Recommendation

The D3S is an affordable, high-end marker with a slim, feature-packed design. With 4 modes of fire (semi, full auto, PSP ramp, and 3 shot burst), a low-pressure F2 bolt engine and weighing-in at a light 2.1lbs, the D3S is budget paintball gun that offers the quality and craftsmanship of more expensive options.

Our Rating: 4.0/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
E-trigger
Fire Rate
15+ BPS
Weight
2.1lbs
Best Suited For
Speedball
Special Features
F2 Bolt Engine

D3FY Sports D3S

Who Should Buy

This is a marker that could be used at almost any level. First-time buyers can afford it, and will enjoy some high-quality features, while more advanced users will be getting a marker they can certainly work with.Click here for the D3FY Sports D3S

Review

The D3S marker from D3FY Sports is an intriguing choice, for a few reasons. First of all, it can be found in the beginner’s price range. However, it hasn’t really been designed as a first-time user gun. With its two-piece 14” barrel, and a barrel bore size of .689, the D3S looks more like something you would find on the $1000+ shelf. Add to that a Micro SQ board with 4 modes of fire, from semi-automatic to 3-shot burst, and the D3S is packed with some serious equipment. All of this at a very light 2.1lb, the D3S has certainly caught my attention.

The only thing is, if you want to make a top-shelf marker, you cannot take shortcuts. And that’s not exactly what D3FY Sports have done, but there are some areas which just aren’t up to scratch with those more expensive markers. Little things like the feeling of the D3S foregrips, the amount of kickback and the incompatibility of the 9V battery with its trigger are enough to discourage some top-end advanced players.

That being said, I really love what D3FY Sports have done with this model. By trying to offer a marker with the highest-quality features possible, while sacrificing some smaller, more specific aspects, they’ve produced an overall top-quality marker. Top-level or professional players may not find it up to their fine-tuned standards, but considering this falls in a much lower price-range, the D3S is a truly incredible achievement.

Pros
  • 4 Modes of fire
  • Great price
  • Lightweight marker
  • Smooth shot
  • Super-class design
Cons
  • Foregrips can be uncomfortable
  • Slight kickback
dye proto rail maxxed
Proto Rail MaXXed
  • 3.8/5 Rating
  • E-trigger
  • 20+ BPS
  • 3.5lb
dye proto rail maxxed

Recommendation

The Dye Proto Rail Maxxed is an impressive upgrade on the original Rail model. With its added two-piece 14″ barrel, this Maxxed upgrade offers a much more consistent and accurate shot than its predecessor. And considering how many useful features have been added, it’s nice to see that the price hasn’t been bumped up too much. Still very much within range of a first-time buyer’s budget

Our Rating: 3.8/5

TECH SPECS

Trigger
E-trigger
Fire Rate
20+ BPS
Weight
3.5lb
Best Suited For
Either
Special Features
2-piece 14” barrel

Proto Rail MaXXed

Who Should Buy

The Dye Proto Rail Maxxed can be used both indoor and outdoor, making it a great selection for paintball players who like to try both disciplines. Accurate, fast, and quiet, the Maxxed will be your best friend for arena and outdoor gameplay alike.Click here for the Proto Rail MaXXed

Review

The Dye Proto Rail marker was already a successful buyer’s option. Now, meet its MaXXed upgrade. A lightweight marker with an extended, two-piece barrel, the Dye Proto Maxxed promises a comfortable, accurate shot. When compared with the original Rail model, this upgrade includes not only the impressively accurate 14” barrel, but Sticky Grips for better access to components, an Ultralight technology airport with on/off toggle system, and Dye Proto’s special closed-spool valve design for less recoil.

The Rail Maxxed operates at an incredibly low 140psi. This gives it a smooth bolt cycle, as well as minimizing recoil for a better, and more consistently accurate shot. Given its smaller frame and lighter carry-weight than other less advanced models, this reduction to kickback is a big factor. A common complaint of smaller, lightweight markers is that it can be difficult to control—fortunately, this is not an issue for the Proto Rail Maxxed.

Pros
  • Two-piece 14” barrel
  • Lightweight
  • Sticky Grips
  • Low 140psi
  • Next-to-zero recoil
Cons
  • Slightly more expensive
  • No pressure gauge on foregrip

How To Choose The Best Paintball Gun

The Definitive Buyer’s Guide

paintball gun buyers guide

So how does a paintball gun work exactly?

so how does a paintball gun work exactly?Paintball markers are pneumatic, so you can think of them like little air compressors, building up a massive amount of pressure which is then delivered very precisely to a small plastic ball containing paint. The tank containing the air, or sometimes carbon dioxide, acts like the stock or butt against your shoulder. The hopper is seated above, feeding directly into the barrel, right in front of the valve and bolt, which control air flow and ball feed velocity.

How were paintball guns invented?

how were paintball guns invented?Would it surprise you to learn that paintball markers and paintballs were invented for lumberjacks?

Around the mid-1960’s a fellow by the name of Charles Nelson, the Co-founder of Nelson Paint Company, was inventing tools for the U.S. Forestry Service to mark trees for lumber. He had invented a spray marker, but the loggers wanted something they could use easily from a distance, across ravines or rivers. The paintball was born.

The paintball marker was a natural necessity to deliver these paintballs to “Mark” the trees which is why we call them Markers, and soon they were being used by ranchers to mark particular cows. Soon, around the early 1980’s, a couple of business tycoons and friends caught wind of this remarkable invention and wished to see if their city boy instincts could match up with a real tactical situation in the woods.

The game was a smashing success, and it’s growing population and speed have given rise to one of the greatest and most exhilarating pastimes we have made. Paintball.

What kind of paintball do you want to play?

what kind of paintball do you want to play?Classically, paintball is either played inside of an arena (speedball) or played outdoors in a course set up to mimic certain scenarios from real world tactical operations (woodsball). The paintball gun play style varies greatly from one to the other with gear and markers set up correctly for those styles of play.

Speedball is played in a small arena, usually no larger than a basketball court (less than 20,000 sq.f). The game is called speedball because of its speed. Often, you will find inflatable geometric shapes called bunkers

Below you can see the bunkers in a speedball game.

These bunkers are arranged symmetrically on the course in a way to give cover and tactical advantage to each team. The two types of game modes played with this style are capture the flag and elimination. Regulation requires players use compact paintball guns with specific grades of paintballs (also seen above).

Markers (“Paintball guns”) are mostly electric with high hopper capacity and extremely fast fire rates, as the rule of thumb is the team sending the most paint downrange has the advantage. Shots fired are significantly higher than in a woodsball game.

Tournaments also specify allowable firing modes and rates of fire.

Find more information on Speedball at Wikipedia.
Wikipedia.org/wiki/Speedball_(paintball)#Game_play
Wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_paintball_leagues

Woodsball is an entirely different monster. These courses can extend in areas larger than a football field, to the size of a small town. As the name suggests, woodsball is played mostly in a heavily wooded area, as trees are the most natural and effective bunkers around. Plus there’s no setup or pulldown, you just go out and play.

Check out a fun droid view of the start of a game:

Sometimes groups will set up certain structures for different game scenarios such as: hostage rescue, fortified bunker elimination, team deathmatch, and many other types of gameplay. There are different organizations that recreate famous battles from history, complete with uniforms, strategy, objectives, and famous landmarks.

Woodsball Wikipedia Page

Which should I play Woodsball or Speedball?

Whereas speedball might be a quick paced gameplay style, woodball matches last hours, and on rare occasions, days. It truly depends on what kind of style and speed you enjoy playing.

Is there a difference in the type of markers needed for Woodsball vs. Speedball?

Yes. Woodsball markers are engineered to provide a higher amount of air psi (pounds of air per square inch exerted in force) allowing for extreme ranges to get tags on the enemy. These markers are mostly constructed to mimic actual styles of weaponry used by today’s military. There are massive amounts of modifications and attachments available, which highly enhance gameplay.

Speedball is a faced paced, small team oriented game style. It’s markers are designed for sending the most amount of paint, as quickly as possible in an enclosed arena, mostly electronic markers. These markers are modified to shoot at unbelievable fire rates, fully automatic dominated most, if not all of the recommended marker types for this style.

  • Woodsball Markers
  • Speedball Markers
  • Range of 90-150 yards
  • Range of 50-100 yards
  • Typically larger/weight of around 15lbs
  • Small & Compact/weight of around 10lbs
  • Usually have lower fire rates 7-10 Bps
  • Have CRAZY fast fire rates 9-15 Bps
  • Customizable
  • Little tactical customization

What types of paintball guns are there?

Mechanical:

Mechanical markers can be semi-automatic or pump action, utilizing valves and air pressure to reset the internal parts of the marker, allowing for the next shot. Because of this process, mechanical markers are much slower than their electric counterparts. You will find most, if not all, of the higher end markers are now electric to allow faster firing rates and more customization.

Electric:

Electronic markers use very accurate sensors and electrically controlled valves to reach EXTREME accuracy in timing, allowing for very high rate of fires. They basically allow you to shut much faster. The batteries vary in charging times, but last for hours guaranteeing it’s not going to randomly die will your on the field.

What’s the diffence between using air vs. co2 in your paintball guns?

CO2, or carbon dioxide, is much cleaner than regular air. Compressed air contains particles which over time, gum up the inside of your marker. Carbon dioxide is cleaner, because it runs at an extremely low temperature.

On the other hand, price also comes into play. Compressed air is renewable and virtually free, whereas CO2 needs to be manufactured and is more expensive to run. Depending on how much you’re playing, you can go through a couple of tanks a day, but the upside to the price, is your markers internal components will last quite a bit longer. Prices for CO2 vary greatly to each provider, so checking around for the best price is advised, but it’s usually not more than $10 bucks per refill.

What should you look for in a paintball gun?

The most important factor when it comes down to buying a paintball gun is focusing on which style of gameplay you’re going to be playing mostly.

Accuracy and the quality of the paintball gun is paramount to having a good experience. When you look at the accuracy of Arena/Speedball markers, they don’t really match the ranges of a more tactical style woodsball marker, suiting them better for Arena style play.

You also must consider the visual aspect of the marker you’re looking at. Buying a more tactical looking marker, mimicking real life builds of weapons used in today’s military, is an awesome way to solidify the intensity of the game’s atmosphere.

Here is a summary checklist to consider when purchasing:

  • Which should I play Woodsball or Speedball?
  • Electrical or mechanical paintball gun?
  • Is it customizable?
  • Does it fit with the other gear I own?
  • What are the most common issues with that particular marker?
  • Kinds of barrel upgrades are available?
  • The weight of the marker?
  • Do we have programmable fire rates?
  • Does it have a digital or mechanical psi display?
  • Are there any customizable electric switches?
  • Is there an option to quickly clear the hopper of jams?

Those are just a few easy things to look at which can tell you if the marker you’re checking out is a good investment!

What are the best paintball gun brands?

Brands like Tippmann and Spyder have become almost commonplace in the paintball communities. Their inexpensiveness and accuracy, combined with reliability in play make them amazing brands to take a look at.

Other very popular brands across woodsball and Arena ball are:

  • Empre
  • Kingman
  • JT Markers
  • Dye
  • Ego
  • This leads us to our next important topic:

    How much do paintball guns cost?

    Markers have a wide price range depending on the style of the marker and the gameplay type of the marker. Arena ball markers in the upper level ranges can cost more than $1,000 but many of the markers in the medium range cost in between $250 and $450.

    This sport requires a little bit more of an investment, compared to other less expensive hobbies, but it’s absolutely worth the extra bucks to get into.

    The next section is probably the most important in this article! I take a look at the gear that comes with your good paintball gun.
    The Gear you’ll need

    Aside from the paintball marker, there are some essential items that you’ll need for safety and more efficient gameplay.

    The first and most important thing would be a mask.

    Paintballs travel 175 miles per hour. Serious and permanent eye damage can result in playing without a mask and every single field requires you to wear one when anywhere near or on the field.

    Barrel bags are the second most important thing. Many times there are static moments in gameplay, when you’re out or when you’re waiting for the game to start. Instead of having to disconnect your air supply every single time, you can put your marker on safety. But not all markers have safeties, and not all safeties are a guarantee that your marker won’t misfire. The barrel bag fits over the end of your barrel, so even if you have a misfire, the bag will catch it!

    Pods are another thing that’s essential to playing. They are your magazines, carrying most of the ammo you will use. It’s not so great when you’re out on the field and your 200 round hopper empties in a couple minutes of intense fire, and you have to call yourself out because you’re out of ammo. Pods solve this problem, usually carrying around 150 extra balls. Carry three of these guys with you and that’s an extra 450 balls. They really make the difference.

    Another thing new guys ask me about is whether or not they need pads for protection. This is purely personal preference and pads are widely accepted. Knee pads are great, especially for intense and long duration woodsball. Arena ball is usually much more fast paced with games ending in less than three minutes sometimes, so use of pads is pretty minimal in that aspect.

    Is it better to rent or buy your paintball equipment?

    This is a tricky area to cover as each paintball shop offers different renting programs…

    Renting is usually for large groups, or people that don’t play regularly. Find a field near you and check out their rental packages!

    Before you invest in a marker, I would try a few rental matches and then invest. For woodsball, there are fewer options available for rentals. The markers available at rental places are usually not in the best condition, which is the point of investing in a great marker!

    Here is a page listing a good number of locations in the US:

    SC Village
    Hollywood Sports
    CPX
    Cousins
    Pevs
    PB Central
    Badlands (IL)
    Badlandz (Canada)
    Wasaga Beach
    Central Florida Paintball

    Other gear to check out

    Hopper: Hoppers can be electrical for fast ball fire rates, or standard for more casual play.

    Air tank: The average tank is steel, but higher end tanks are made from fiberglass composites. The fiberglass tanks are lighter, but much more expensive.

    Vest: Arena ball players don’t really wear vests, as they get into the way of speed and tactic, but woodsball players take complete advantage of having a lot of extra pockets.

    Pants: Paintball specific pants are available and they are great. I’ve worn the same red and white pair for years. They are durable and keep your legs safe from the environment. They also limit the pain of getting shot in the thigh. Ouch.

    Gloves: Gloves are great, and anyone who has been shot in the fingers or the back of their hands will swear by them. Arena ball players use fingerless as the mechanic of those paintball markers depend heavily on finger dexterity.

    What should you wear for a game of paintball?

    Besides your safety gear like your mask, clothing is purely optional. It depends on your level of reaction to pain and willingness to be shot on your bare skin. Many veteran players, including myself, wear pants and a long sleeve shirt. For hotter weather, wearing breathable material is essential.

    How many paintballs do you use in a day?

    This varies greatly over the style you’re playing. Arena ball players can use more than 3,000 balls per day, whereas woodsball players might use around 1,500. It really just depends on how much your playing and for how long. A box usually holds about 2,000 balls, so picking up a couple boxes will be more than enough. The cost varies per brand, but the medium quality balls aren’t more than $30.00 a case. Standard paintballs come in the .68 caliber.

    How bad does getting hit hurt?

    Paintballs at a medium range, with regulation psi (260-300) the shots can create bruising and sometimes break skin. They definitely hurt, but it’s nothing dangerous and you can easily recover from it.

    How far do paintball guns shoot?

    The recommended regulation psi for markers is between 260 psi and 300 psi. This translates to around 175 mph, which is pretty darn fast. There are so many different variables, like wind speed and barrel quality to name a few, that can affect range. At the lower range psi, a paintball will generally travel around 50 to 60 yards. At higher range psi they can typically travel 80 to 100 yards.

    Is paintball paint washable?

    It varies from brand to brand. Higher quality and more expensive brands tend to use a higher quality paint which washes out fairly easy, like the Empire Red box balls. Cheaper brands might use a lower quality formula which can lead to staining! I’ve stained many items of clothing over the years, so it’s a good practice to pick out a paintball only outfit.

    Should I be upgrading my barrel?

    should i be upgrading my barrel?There are so many different barrel options available. The most important thing about picking a barrel is making sure the threading from marker to barrel match up. It’s so important because forcing a barrel with the wrong threads can easily ruin any paintball marker.

    You should be looking into barrel upgrades if you find the accuracy of your marker not meeting your standard for shooting. A new barrel can make a sub par marker into a real force to be reckoned with.

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